Why Is There Water Underneath the Furnace?

If there is water pooling around the furnace, it could be a sign that something is wrong inside the furnace. The issue could be one of many problems, such as:

  1. Condensation

A condensation problem is the most common cause of water underneath and around the furnace. Both high-efficiency and standard-efficiency furnaces can experience condensation issues, but they stem from different causes. High-efficiency furnaces, also called condensing furnaces, produce condensation that is supposed to be channeled into a floor drain. If it is pooling instead, the tubing or drain could have become clogged. The tubing might also have a crack in it.

A standard-efficiency furnace is not supposed to produce any condensation. If it is producing condensation that means the flue pipe may not be properly sized and it should be corrected as soon as possible.

  1. Faulty Exchanger

Another possibility in a condensing furnace is that the secondary heat exchanger is faulty. This type of furnace usually has two or three heat exchangers instead of one like standard furnaces. If the secondary heat exchanger has a crack, water can drip out onto the floor. This problem could result in the need for a total furnace replacement.

  1. Humidifier

Some furnaces have a humidifier inside that adds moisture to the warm air blown throughout the house. This humidifier could be leaking, letting the water pool on the floor beneath it. This issue can usually be caught early on during furnace maintenance.

Don’t dismiss water pooling around the bottom of the furnace. No matter if the furnace is high efficiency or standard efficiency, it could mean there’s a serious problem that should be repaired right away. Make sure to schedule annual furnace maintenance with Diamond Heating and Cooling to catch these issues early or call us at 208-608-5050 if water is present.

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What Causes Short Cycling?

When the furnace starts and stops frequently, it is call short cycling. This decreases the furnace’s efficiency and could be a sign of a serious furnace issue. However, the most common source of short cycling is a clogged air filter. Check the filter first, replacing it if necessary. If that doesn’t stop the short cycling, it could be one of the following problems causing it:

  1. Thermostat Location

If the thermostat has been poorly located, it can cause short cycling to occur. It should be placed away from drafts, effects of windows and air vents. To see if this is the issue, place something in front of the thermostat like a piece of cardboard. If the short cycling stops, it needs to be moved to a new location.

  1. Overheating

Many modern furnaces have a safety device that switches the burner off if the heat exchanger starts to overheat. This can also cause short cycling. If the heat exchanger is overheating, there’s a possibility of it being cracked, which should be repaired right away.

  1. Improper Furnace Size

Furnaces that are the wrong size for the home will short cycle trying to keep up with the desired temperature. To correct this issue, it will require a new system to be put in place that is the correct size. While expensive, it will save homeowners money on energy bills and keep the home at a more comfortable temperature.

Don’t live with a short cycling furnace. It could be increasing energy bills and not achieving the desired temperature. Continuing to let it short cycle could lead to lasting HVAC damage as well. Call Diamond Heating and Cooling if the furnace starts short cycling this fall and winter.

Also, be sure to schedule annual furnace maintenance. Check out Diamond’s Silver Club Membership and learn how to save on all things HVAC.

Use a Heat Pump This Winter

Heat Pumps

Heat pumps can be an energy-efficient alternative to furnaces during cold Idaho winters. They work by extracting outside heat and transferring it inside. Even air that seems too cold, like during winter, has heat energy present for the system to use.

Because heat pumps move heat instead of generating it, their biggest advantage is energy efficiency. They can provide the same comfort level as a conventional heat source for as little as one quarter of the conventional source’s operating cost.

While there are three types of heat pumps, the most commonly used is the air-source heat pump. This transfers heat between the home and outside air using electricity. It can reduce electricity use for heating by about 50 percent when compared to electric resistance heating.

Before, heat pumps were only sufficient in moderate climates where the temperature didn’t drop too low. With recent technology developments, they can now provide sufficient heating in colder climates too. Often, a heat pump is paired with a furnace for supplemental heating if needed in subfreezing temperatures.

In homes without ducts, a mini-split heat pump, which is a type of ductless air-source heat pump, is a viable option. These can operate in climates as low as -13 degrees Fahrenheit to keep the home warm all winter long.

Heat pumps aren’t just for heating in the winter, however. They can also be used to keep the home cool in the warmer months by reversing the process, extracting the warm air from inside the home and putting it outside. It pulls double duty year-round to keep the house comfortable while using less energy, helping homeowners to save money.

Diamond Heating and Cooling can install a heat pump or mini split heat pump for homes that want to save on heating costs or when a current heating option is unavailable. Call us to learn more about these heating options.

 

Covering the Air Conditioner

AC-Covers

With fall on its way in a few weeks, it’s time to start preparing to turn off the air conditioner for the year. After turning it off, many homeowners wonder if they should cover it when the weather turns cold. The air conditioner is built to withstand many elements of the weather, but there are some instances when covering it is a good idea.

During fall, the air conditioner should be covered to protect it from leaves, seeds, and nuts. These are things that can get inside the AC unit, allowing moisture to collect and sit. This can cause corrosion and rust.

Other than this, a cover isn’t needed for much else. Here is what the air conditioner doesn’t need to be protected from:

  • Dirt

While operating during the summer, the air conditioner can suck in quite a bit of dirt. This is expected and is removed with the filters. However, once the unit is turned off, dirt is no longer and issue.

  • Snow and Ice

Outside units are built to withstand just about anything winter can throw at it. The snow and ice shouldn’t cause any issues.

  • Rodents

Animals might burrow into the outside unit to escape the cold weather especially when there is a cover on the unit. It’s best to keep the cover off when worried about rodents.

When choosing a cover for the outside air conditioning unit, avoid getting one that covers it completely. The cover should allow some breathing room on the sides. If the unit is completely covered, moisture can get trapped inside, creating a humid environment perfect for rust, corrosion, and mold.

Not sure whether to cover the AC unit or not, or what type of cover to get? The folks at Diamond Heating and Cooling can assist homeowners in finding the right type of cover for their system and discussing when it is best to use it.

Why Schedule Annual HVAC Maintenance?

Furnace Maintenance Boise

Boise and the surrounding area might still be getting hit with heat, but fall will be here before we know it. The best time to get the furnace serviced is before it’s going to be used. This makes the transition time between summer and fall the perfect time for HVAC maintenance.

Many people wonder why Diamond Heating and Cooling recommends annual maintenance checks for the air conditioner and furnace. Well, it’s really to save homeowners money. When their technicians come out to perform maintenance, they inspect all the components of the furnace, checking them for possible issues.

In doing this, they can catch major issues before they happen, saving homeowners hundreds of dollars later in the year. Without that maintenance, a part might break that needs replacing or the entire system could be compromised, leaving homeowners with no heat in the middle of winter.

Annual maintenance does cost money, but it doesn’t have to break the bank. Diamond Heating and Cooling offers customers the Silver Club Membership, which is a great way to save on maintenance costs and be sure the system gets serviced in the spring and fall.

Members pay $13.50 a month for this service, during which Diamond Heating and Cooling will come out twice a year to perform maintenance on the air conditioner and furnace. Here are some other great savings and perks that members receive:

Guaranteed appointment within 24 hours

Free safety check

2 free 1-inch standard pleated filters a year

20% discount on all service parts and labor

$49.00 diagnostic fee

20% discount on IAQ

Blower motor pulled at no charge once every 3 years of membership

All HVAC systems qualify for the membership. Don’t wait for the furnace to break down before getting it checked. Schedule annual maintenance and save with the help of Diamond Heating and Cooling.

 

Don’t Close Air Vents

In an effort to save more money by using less energy, many people close their air vents in rooms that get little or no use. However, instead of saving money, it could cause some serious issues. Read on to learn why closing vents does not have the desired effect on air distribution.

The blower in the HVAC system pulls air from the house through the return ducts, cools it, and pushes it back out through the supply ducts. The blower in high-efficiency HVAC systems is powered by an electronically commutated motor, also referred to as an ECM. This type of motor can adjust its speed. Those that are not high-efficiency are permanent split capacitor or PSC powered, which cannot adjust speeds.

Both systems are designed so that the blower pushes against some maximum pressure difference. If the filter is dirty or the supply ducts are restricted, the blower has to push against a higher pressure.

In the ECM system, this will make the motor increase in intensity to maintain proper air flow. As it works against the higher pressure, all efficiency is lost. A PSC motor will keep spinning, but its speed will decrease as the pressure increases.

When air ducts are closed in some rooms, the system becomes more restrictive. A higher pressure in the system will either ramp up the ECM blower, or move less air with a PSC blower, while also creating duct leakage.

This can also have an impact on the coil or heat exchanger. Lower airflow means a lower rate of heat exchange will occur. This will cause less heat to flow over the coil, making it colder, and possibly freezing. The refrigerant may not properly evaporate either, meaning it would come back into the compressor,  possibly ruining it.

In summary, here are 5 problems that can come from closing air vents:

  • Duct Leakage
  • Lower Air Flow/Increased Energy Use
  • Comfort Issues
  • Frozen Coil
  • Dead Compressor

Don’t close vents to save money. Instead, use an adjustable thermostat and be mindful of the energy being used.

3 Common Allergens to Worry About

Allergens

People worry about the outside air they breathe, but actually their main focus should be the air inside their home. With indoor air carrying 2 to 5 times more pollutants than outdoor air, poor indoor air quality is a concerning problem that should be addressed.

There are many allergens floating around both inside and outside, but some can be more troubling than others. Here are three of the most common allergens found in homes, and how to get rid of them:

  1. Dust Mites

Dust mites feed on human skin flakes and thrive in rooms with 40% humidity and above, and temperatures around 70 degrees. While they are commonly found in the bedroom, they can thrive anywhere in the house if it matches these conditions.

To eliminate as many dust mites as possible, wash all sheets, blankets, pillowcases, and bed covers in hot water. The water should be at least 130 degrees Fahrenheit to kill the dust mites. Use dust-proof covers on mattresses, box springs, and pillows to prevent their return.

  1. Mold

Mold loves wet, dark places in homes. The easiest way to keep mold spores from entering the air is to eliminate their chance of growing. Keep a fan on in the bathroom during and after showers, fix leaky appliances and faucets immediately, and use a dehumidifier when necessary.

If mold is found, call someone right away to get it looked at. Some mold can be toxic, causing even more serious health problems than an asthma attack or allergy flare-up.

  1. Pollen

While pollen has a huge impact outdoors, it can also have an impact indoors. Pollen can travel inside by clinging to clothing and shoes. Wiping down pets, keeping the windows closed, and using a media air cleaner can combat the issue of pollen inside the home.

Those with allergies or asthma shouldn’t have to suffer inside too. Take precautions to eliminate these three common indoor allergens and make breathing a little easier. Talk to Diamond Heating and Cooling about what they can do to help improve indoor air quality.