Why Is There Water Underneath the Furnace?

If there is water pooling around the furnace, it could be a sign that something is wrong inside the furnace. The issue could be one of many problems, such as:

  1. Condensation

A condensation problem is the most common cause of water underneath and around the furnace. Both high-efficiency and standard-efficiency furnaces can experience condensation issues, but they stem from different causes. High-efficiency furnaces, also called condensing furnaces, produce condensation that is supposed to be channeled into a floor drain. If it is pooling instead, the tubing or drain could have become clogged. The tubing might also have a crack in it.

A standard-efficiency furnace is not supposed to produce any condensation. If it is producing condensation that means the flue pipe may not be properly sized and it should be corrected as soon as possible.

  1. Faulty Exchanger

Another possibility in a condensing furnace is that the secondary heat exchanger is faulty. This type of furnace usually has two or three heat exchangers instead of one like standard furnaces. If the secondary heat exchanger has a crack, water can drip out onto the floor. This problem could result in the need for a total furnace replacement.

  1. Humidifier

Some furnaces have a humidifier inside that adds moisture to the warm air blown throughout the house. This humidifier could be leaking, letting the water pool on the floor beneath it. This issue can usually be caught early on during furnace maintenance.

Don’t dismiss water pooling around the bottom of the furnace. No matter if the furnace is high efficiency or standard efficiency, it could mean there’s a serious problem that should be repaired right away. Make sure to schedule annual furnace maintenance with Diamond Heating and Cooling to catch these issues early or call us at 208-608-5050 if water is present.

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What Causes Short Cycling?

When the furnace starts and stops frequently, it is call short cycling. This decreases the furnace’s efficiency and could be a sign of a serious furnace issue. However, the most common source of short cycling is a clogged air filter. Check the filter first, replacing it if necessary. If that doesn’t stop the short cycling, it could be one of the following problems causing it:

  1. Thermostat Location

If the thermostat has been poorly located, it can cause short cycling to occur. It should be placed away from drafts, effects of windows and air vents. To see if this is the issue, place something in front of the thermostat like a piece of cardboard. If the short cycling stops, it needs to be moved to a new location.

  1. Overheating

Many modern furnaces have a safety device that switches the burner off if the heat exchanger starts to overheat. This can also cause short cycling. If the heat exchanger is overheating, there’s a possibility of it being cracked, which should be repaired right away.

  1. Improper Furnace Size

Furnaces that are the wrong size for the home will short cycle trying to keep up with the desired temperature. To correct this issue, it will require a new system to be put in place that is the correct size. While expensive, it will save homeowners money on energy bills and keep the home at a more comfortable temperature.

Don’t live with a short cycling furnace. It could be increasing energy bills and not achieving the desired temperature. Continuing to let it short cycle could lead to lasting HVAC damage as well. Call Diamond Heating and Cooling if the furnace starts short cycling this fall and winter.

Also, be sure to schedule annual furnace maintenance. Check out Diamond’s Silver Club Membership and learn how to save on all things HVAC.